• If you are in acute pain dial 911 or go to the nearest Emergency Department.

  • You can receive medication in the ER for a small number of visits.  When they decide that your frequency is too great using the Ohio Automated Rx Reporting System, they will inform you that they cannot treat you for pain any longer.  Prior to that,  ER physician may give you enough pain medication for 2-3 days.

  • Physicians must justify giving you opioids beyod 7 days, and will almost certainly not be willing to incur that visibility with the State of Ohio.  It is nearly impossible to receive opioid pain medication for any more than 7 days, either as an inpatient, or an outpatient, unless you are terminally ill.  This is now State Law.

  • DO NOT  go to the Ohio State University Medical Center.  They have gone far beyond the limitations imposed by the State and may not medicate you for pain at all.  OSUMC has discontinued ALL Pain Management programs except for Palliative Care, and this program is now limited to the terminally ill.

  • DO  have your Primary Care Physician refer you to a Pain Management specialist who will accept your insurance. NOTE:  Do your research first.  There are many more BAD PM specialists than good ones.    You will also have to go outside of the OSU system. A Pain Management specialist may be able to justfy giving you opioids for more than 7 days.  

  • Unfortunately, it takes weeks to see a PM specialist.  Unless your PCP is trying avoiding liability associated with the new Ohio laws, they should be able to give you pain medication for up to 7 days.

  • In the best-case scenario, you can become established with a Pain Management specialist BEFORE you urgently need pain medication.  

  • Please be patient.  It is very difficult to become an established patient in a Pain Management program.

  • Here is a brief summary of the current laws inposed under Ohio Senate Bill 119 that affect you:

    • Unless you are in a Pain Management program, you cannot be prescribed opioids for longer than 7 days.  This includes both inpatients and outpatients. 

    • If you are treated in an ER, you can receive pain medication while there.  You can not receive more than a 3 day supply of pain medication when you are released.

    • Chronic pain patients CANNOT receive more that 50 mg. of a Morphine Equivalent Dose in one day from any Pain Management physician.  This will soon be reduced to 30 mg MED.  Examples of this are:
      • 7     Tylenol #3
      • 6    5 mg. Vicodan
      • 4       5 mg. Percocet
      • 4       2 mg. Dilaudid
      • 2      5 mg. Opana

    • If your Pain Management physicians notices any sign of addiction, they are required by law to taper you off of the medication and not prescibe it again.
      (Now wait a minute! Any Pain Management specialist will tell you that you will be dependent on the opioid if you continue in the program.  What is up with that?  This is a no win situation under the present legislation.  Please sign the Petition! )